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The game of nations; the amorality of power
The game of nations; the amorality of power

The game of nations; the amorality of power politics. by Miles Copeland

The game of nations; the amorality of power politics.



The game of nations; the amorality of power politics. ebook




The game of nations; the amorality of power politics. Miles Copeland ebook
ISBN: 0671205323, 9780671205324
Format: djvu
Page: 316
Publisher: Simon & Schuster


THE GAME OF NATIONS: The Amorality of Power Politics By Miles Copeland But how does physics and 9/11 fit in all of the games? Copeland, in "The Game Of Nations: Amorality of Power Politics" describes a game that is unmistakably based on the shame-honor code. Download eBook ~ The game of nations; the amorality of power politics. Examples of lion and fox politics where self-interest and amoral behavior are prevalent. Interests, life turns into nothing more than a power game and is unbearable. Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. 3 Jul 2011 - 7 min - Uploaded by geto20 Report profile image; Flag for spam; Block User; Unblock User. Side of the struggle for power--makes for war, tyranny, economic ruin, and barbarism. The game of nations: the amorality of power politics · Miles Copeland Snippet view - 1970. (Autumn, 1957): 350–54; Miles Copeland, The Game of Nations: The Amorality of Power Politics (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1969), 105. The game of nations: the amorality of power politics · Copeland, Miles. CONTRIBUTORS: Author: Copeland, Miles. The game of nations; the amorality of power politics. The negative side of the realists' emphasis on power and self-interest is often Wars are fought to prevent competing nations from becoming militarily stronger. American Intelligence and the Middle East *Miles Copeland: The Game of Nations: The Amorality of Power Politics. By Miles Copeland - Find this book online from $22.65. Thucydides' realism, neither immoral nor amoral, can rather be .. The game of nations: The amorality of power politics. (London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1969. Certain patterns emerge, which we call “political games.” The second game we explore is the lion and the fox: the politics of the nation-state.